MYSORIAN MAYA

Cyrus Daily Messages

Near the end of March, (1936) Baba began suffering from stomach pains and showed that he was in much discomfort. Chhagan, who knew some ayurvedic treatments, gave Baba a metal ring to wear; but Baba removed it the next day when his finger became swollen. Others, too, were not well. Sister Mani’s mastoid became infected and, on March 23rd, she was admitted to a hospital where she was operated on two days later. Naja, who was doing the cooking in Mysore, was appointed to be by Mani’s side in the hospital, so Khorshed took over the cooking duty. But she too came down with fever. Valu also fell ill, and it seemed that one difficulty after another began plaguing them. Mehera remained healthy and was occupied with Baba’s personal needs, and Indu helped in the kitchen. Nevertheless, things were unsettled in the bungalow due to all these complications.

Among the men, Chhagan, whose duty was night watch near Baba, also became indisposed. Another problem was that some local ruffians began throwing rocks at the bungalow during the night, and then cut holes in the bamboo matting surrounding the house to see what was going on inside. The bamboo matting served as a fence for the women’s privacy.

Before all the illness struck, Soonamasi had been keeping watch outside the bungalow during the day; but since she was appointed to cook for Mani, there was no one to take her place. Since none of the men mandali was allowed to go to the women’s side, Baba himself began keeping watch, and when Soonamasi was done cooking she would relieve him.

“It is all Mysorian Maya,” Baba stated, “working with all its might, creating complications on all sides!”

Baba went to see Mani at the hospital two or three times a day, carrying soup or some other liquid for her. He would also constantly send Chanji to the doctor to make certain Mani was treated well. The nurses at the all-women hospital were greatly drawn to Baba, even though his identity was not disclosed.

Lord Meher Original ed., Bhau Kalchuri, Vol. 6, pp. 1992 – 1993.

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