BABA’S WORDS HAD A SALUBRIOUS EFFECT

Cyrus Daily Messages

They returned to Hardwar, and Baba decided to proceed to Amritsar for further mast contacts. They boarded a train on July 27th, (1946) and were surprised to find plenty of accommodation in a military compartment. But before the train left, the conductor came and told them to move to another compartment, as this one was reserved for military personnel only. The train was about to leave and the other compartments were already overcrowded. There were hardly half a dozen soldiers in the military compartment, and they had no objection to Baba’s remaining, so they stayed where they were.

But after the train stopped at Roorkee and Saharanpur, the compartment filled to overflowing. Tempers rose as each soldier tried to make a place for himself. Before too long, there was a near riot in the speeding train. Bayonets were brandished and hockey sticks were swung; pandemonium had broken out.

Suddenly, there was a loud clap, and everyone turned to see Baba standing on one of the wooden seats. “The effect was instantaneous,” Eruch remembered, “though I do not know how it could have been heard in that raucous din.”

The soldiers stopped fighting and stared up at Baba, who had raised his hands for them to cease. In his flowing white sadra, it seemed as if the darkness of their frenzy was dispelled by the rays of light issuing from his robe. They were mystified by his glowing physical features. Their wrath subsided and their hearts were eased by a soothing calmness. Baba then smiled, and his smile dissipated their anger.

Baba dictated a short message on his board, which Eruch read out to the soldiers:

“It is not good to fight among yourselves; it will not solve anything. You are soldiers, and the safety of our country rests on your shoulders. If you start fighting among yourselves, how will you safeguard the interests of the nation? Your fighting should be reserved for the protection of the country’s citizens. The entire country trusts you, and if you betray this trust, then how will you protect the lives of your brothers and sisters? You are all brothers, and brothers should not fight! Now sit down.”

Baba’s words had a salubrious effect and all sat down. Baba promised everyone tea at the next station and told Eruch to break open the tin of sweets which they had with them. At the next station the tea was brought, and Baba distributed it and the sweets with his own hands to every soldier. The murderous atmosphere of minutes before turned into one of camaraderie.

Sitting among them, Baba talked with each through Eruch and asked the soldiers to narrate their experiences in the war. However, finding it increasingly difficult to continue travelling in the same train with the soldiers, Baba and the men got down at Ambala. Kaka and Adi were told to gather information and locations of masts in Simla. Baba with Baidul and Eruch left by another train for Amritsar, where they stayed in a traveler’s rest bungalow.

Lord Meher, Original ed., Bhau Kalchuri, Vol. 9, pp. 3116 – 3117.

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